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Offensive linemen the Packers could target in each round of the draft

Outside of their preferred starters, the Packers are thin on the offensive line

Round 1 (#22, #28)

With the release of Billy Turner, the Packers are likely going to slot in Elgton Jenkins as their right tackle of the future. Like left tackle David Bakhtiari, though, there’s no guarantee he’ll be back from his ACL in time to start the season. That leaves Green Bay a little light on the offensive line. The Packers probably won’t go hunting for depth in the first round, but with two picks, you never know.

Bernhard Raimann, OT, Central Michigan

Raimann transitioned from a tight end to an offensive tackle in 2020 and is still a little raw, but he is quickly improving. He’s very technically sound for having only played for two seasons. As a former tight end, he has great feet and has made clear strides from game-to-game. He’s quick out of his stance and works well blocking in space on pin and pull schemes and screens. He still doesn’t have great instincts and can get a little mechanical, but if Green Bay has its starting five, he will have time to develop in those areas. He’s a great prospect with lots of potential.

Round 2 (#53, #59)

Chris Paul, IOL, Tulsa

Paul started all four years at Tulsa and played two of those years at guard and two at tackle. He struggles a little bit in pass protection at tackle, so he’s probably a guard at the next level. He’s good with his hand usage and excels in the run game. He’s definitely got some weak points in his game, like lateral movement and his ability to anchor, but as a depth piece on the interior, you could definitely do worse.

Round 3 (#92)

Lecitus Smith, IOL, Virginia Tech

Smith is a guard through-and-through. He plays with an edge and sets the tone on the offensive line – especially in the run game. He creates excellent drive and is fantastic on combo blocks. He can pick up blitzes, stay square, and uses his strength well. He doesn’t have a ton of burst to track down second-level defenders and his arms are a little short which can let defensive linemen get into his chest.

Round 4 (#130, #136)

Cole Strange, IOL, Chattanooga

Strange is aggressive and can bounce all around the offensive line. He’s made starts at guard, center, and tackle through his time at Chattanooga. His run blocking and football IQ are his calling cards. He’s a good enough athlete to make blocks in space and plays with good leverage. He can struggle in pass protection and hand usage when playing quicker interior defensive linemen, but has versatility as a late round pick-up.

Rounds 5-7 (#170, #224, #245, #255)

Tyrese Robinson, IOL, Oklahoma

Robinson was the best pass protector at Oklahoma and plays with a physical edge. He played at guard in 2019 and 2020, but bumped outside to tackle in 2021. He doesn’t have the length to play tackle in the NFL, but in a pinch, he can slot in all over the line. He’s a fit in zone blocking schemes, but was a little stiff in his hips when moving in space.